Tag Archives: June beetles

May beetles on pecans






Nearly everyone who’s grown up in a rural or semi-rural area of Texas knows about “Junebugs”, or more correctly, June beetles. These are the heavy bodied, spindly legged beetles that flock to lights at night.  Even in my suburban home, miles from pastures or farm fields, we get June beetles and their relatives coming in waves throughout the spring, clumsily bumping against window screens, drawn by the light. It seems that “June beetle” is not a very accurate descriptor of the dozens of species of spring emerging scarab beetles that… Read More →




Grubs in the spring no big thing






As winter ends the good earth beckons. If you need proof, just listen this weekend.  Like rattling sabers, you’ll hear gardeners everywhere dragging their spades, mattocks and hoes from storage. It’s an inevitable ritual of spring. Just as inevitably, many gardeners will gasp as their thoughts of seed packets are interrupted by the sight of glistening white grubs in the newly turned soil. White grubs are the immature life stage of the June beetle and its relatives. And as most Texas gardeners know, white grubs are not good.  After… Read More →